©2002 Arizona CERT
    
 

Daniel C. Malone, Ph.D.

 

Daniel C. Malone, Ph.D, R.Ph., is an associate professor at the University of Arizona Colleges of Pharmacy and Public Health. Dan received a Bachelor of Science degree in Pharmacy from the University of Colorado , graduating Magna Cum Laude. Dr. Malone received a Master of Science in Pharmacy in 1990 and his Doctor of Philosophy in 1993 from The University of Texas. He completed an AHRQ post-doctoral fellowship in the Departments of Public Health and Community Medicine and Pharmacy at the University of Washington. Dan was on the faculty with the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver prior to joining the University of Arizona in 1999.

Dr. Malone has served as the Director of the Division of Pharmaceutical Policy within the Center for Health Outcomes and PharmacoEconomic Research since July 2000. He teaches courses in biostatistics, professional practice management, and US health care systems to pharmacy doctoral students. In the graduate program at the University of Arizona he teaches health technology assessment, applied health technology assessment and pharmaceutical policy. He has served as the major advisor for five doctoral students and seven master of science students.

His area of expertise is in pharmacoeconomics and health services research. Dr. Malone is the co-principal investigator for the University of Arizona Center for Education and Research on Therapeutics (CERT) grant from the Agency for Healthcare Quality and Research and is the director of the drug-drug core that is focusing on drug-drug interactions. He is currently the co-principal investigator for drug-drug interaction study funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He has had extensive experience in pharmacy demonstration projects and economic and policy issues associated with the pharmaceutical industry. Dr. Malone has published over 45 articles and been successful in obtaining over $8 million in extramural support for research and policy development programs.